Runboard.com
You're welcome.

runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

 
RogersPast Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Forum Photo Aide
Global user

Registered: 03-2008
Posts: 51
Reply | Quote
1983 - Stripping Off Pearl


--Log in or sign up to see linked image content--

Copyright (c) 2008, John Cermenaro
3/12/2008, 10:06 am Link to this post  
 
JohnC 1984 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Rogers R&D 1980-84
Global user

Registered: 01-2008
Posts: 100
Reply | Quote
1983 - Stripping Off Pearl


All it took was one blemish in the pearl covering and the drum would be rejected. (Example: a grain of sand stuck to the glue before adhering to the shell would create a bump or crack in the pearl.) The person in this photo would squirt acetone between the pearl and the shell, then work that blade to peel off the pearl. He'd then use that pneumatic sander to get the glue residue off the shell. Sounds barbaric, but it worked and the shell was perfectly usable when done, as illustrated by the shells stacked up on the left. There was no harm done to the 8-ply maple.

This was a horrible job. Time consuming and essentially toxic. If you're not familiar with acetone, think nail polish remover. Now imagine pouring enough onto a drum shell to get the covering off. Today, the EPA would classify this as a major spill and send in a bunch of guys in wearing chrome suits.

Now if we were doing all the pearl coverings in Fullerton, we wouldn't have as many re-work shells as you see here. These are all shells from the plant in Ensenada, Mexico. The whole Mexico thing was, as far as I could tell, all about the bean counters. Cheap labor. We were basically outsourcing part of the job to Ensenada, they'd ship the shells to us drilled with pearl on them, and we'd do the final assembly in Fullerton.

Dave Gordon was REALLY pissed that management decided to move some of the manufacturing to Mexico, so the directive came down that we were to be extra diligent when evaluating the Mexico shells for defects. We rejected a LOT of them. Standards were very high.

Wouldn't you know it, the cheap labor in Mexico was offset by the huge cost of rework. Suddenly we got our drum line back!

- John Cermenaro

3/14/2008, 7:59 pm Link to this post Send Email to JohnC 1984   Send PM to JohnC 1984
 


Add a reply





You are not logged in (login)